Redistricting

CITY COUNCIL ADOPTS REDISTRICTING PLAN

City Council unanimously voted in approval of the City's redistricting plan, which will take effect immediately.

The basic purpose of redistricting is to equalize population among electoral districts when the Census indicates that a city or state’s population has increased or decreased in the last decade.

Greenville is a growing city. Its population increased 22 percent between 2010 and 2020.  The Constitution requires the City to redraw the lines that define the boundaries for the four City Council district seats.

See How the City's Population Changed from 2010 to 2020

This page, and the updates provided throughout the process, ensured transparency during the process.

Redistricting Map AVAILABLE

The City of Greenville has released a redistricting map.

Guided by the criteria outlined in their January 2022 resolution, City Council created four districts with roughly the same population. The map shows districts, and allows residents to search property by address to find the district. Areas where Council districts change are clearly marked. 

Since publication of the draft redistricting plan, City Council received feedback on the plan from the public via the city’s website, email and in person at meetings held in each of the four council districts.  As a result of that input, the draft plan was updated and can be seen below, along with an updated table showing data and demographics for each district.

Redistricting Map

PUBLIC MEETINGS 

The City of Greenville hosted drop-in meetings in November and December to receive public comment on a proposed redistricting plan. Recordings of previous informational meetings are below.

WHY ARE WE REDRAWING DISTRICT LINES?

The 2020 United States Census showed a shift in population density within the city limits, meaning districts are no longer balanced.

The law requires equity, so the City’s redistricting goal is to have four districts as close to the same number of people as possible. The target population should be as close as possible to 17,680 people per district.

WHO DECIDED THE NEW BOUNDARIES?

City Council members made final decisions with input from City residents and staff on how the new lines are drawn.

Overall Population Changes by District

Council District 2010 Population 2020 Population % Population Change Population Change
Needed for Redistricting
1 15,099 16,684 10.50% 996
2 14,173 15,478 9.21% 2,202
3 13,763 15,078 9.55% 2,602
4 15,374 23,480 52.73% -5,800
Total 58,409 70,720 21.08%  

Population Totals by Ethnicity & Race

Council District 2010 Hispanic  2020 Hispanic 2010 Non-Hispanic White 2020 Non-Hispanic White 2010 Non-Hispanic Black* 2020 Non-Hispanic Black*
1 1,045 1,284 12,437 12,749 1,091 1,547
2 425 947 5,561 7,668 7,935 6,378
3 1,514 1,303 4,638 7,144 7,286 6,062
4 459 1,394 13,140 17,943 1,365 2,634
Total 3,443 4,928 35,776 45,504 17,677 16,621

Percent of Total Population by Ethnicity & Race

Council District 2010 % Hispanic 2020 % Hispanic 2010 % Non-Hispanic White 2020 % Non-Hispanic White 2010 % Non-Hispanic Black* 2020 % Non-Hispanic Black*
1 6.92% 7.70% 82.37% 76.41% 7.23% 9.27%
2 3.00% 6.12% 39.24% 49.54% 55.99% 41.21%
3 11.00% 8.64% 33.70% 47.38% 52.94% 40.20%
4 2.99% 5.94% 85.47% 76.42% 8.88% 11.22%

*Includes people who identify as Non-Hispanic Black (single race) and Non-Hispanic multiple race Black and White. 
Source: Statistics derived from the Decennial Census P.L. 94-171, Table 2 Redistricting Data within the Esri Redistricting Online Web Application